Communication Strategies for Mitigating COVID-19 Vaccination Hesitancy in Benin City, Nigeria

  • Jamiu Mohammed Abubakar Department of Mass Communication University of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria
  • Queen Tosan Nwoko Department of Mass Communication Auchi Polytechnic, Auchi, Edo State, Nigeria

Abstract

This study was carried out to determine the communication strategies for mitigating COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy as well as factors and perception causing the hesitancy in Benin City, Nigeria. A survey research design was employed and a total of 400 adults in Benin City, Nigeria completed the study by filling out the questionnaire. The findings showed that respondents have an overall relatively very low extent of likelihood to accept COVID-19 vaccination because of dissenting reasons, lack of trust in the government and deliberate hesitation. The findings of the study also revealed that respondents believed their immune system was enough to protect them against the virus and that COVID-19 vaccine is not necessary in Nigeria. It was also revealed that people perceived COVID-19 vaccine not be safe. More than 70% of the respondents said that communication strategies providing information on the overall effectiveness of these vaccines will help mitigate hesitancy towards COVID-19 vaccination and that important elite/opinion or community leader’s vaccination process should be recorded for display to mitigate suspicions in relation to COVID-19 vaccine. It was, therefore, recommended that health communication experts should put more effort to reach multicultural settings in order to change the mind-set and believe of vaccine resistant citizens.

Author Biography

Jamiu Mohammed Abubakar, Department of Mass Communication University of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria




Published
2022-07-06
How to Cite
ABUBAKAR, Jamiu Mohammed; NWOKO, Queen Tosan. Communication Strategies for Mitigating COVID-19 Vaccination Hesitancy in Benin City, Nigeria. SAU JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, [S.l.], v. 7, n. 2, p. 43-63, july 2022. Available at: <https://journals.sau.edu.ng/index.php/sjmas/article/view/731>. Date accessed: 30 sep. 2022.