Production and Reception of Patriarchal Ideology in Seasoning Product Advertisements

  • Oluwakemi E. Akerele-Popoola Department of Mass Communication Landmark University, Omu-Aran Kwara State, Nigeria
  • Prof. Adesina Lukuman Azeez Department of Mass Communication University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria

Abstract

The researchers investigated the influence of patriarchy ideology in Nigeria seasoning product advertisements using discourse analysis of qualitative research methodology. The researchers examined how patriarchal ideologies are embedded in Nigerian seasoning product advertisements using two purposely selected seasoning product advertisements; Onga and Knorr advertisements. Findings from the study revealed that women were represented consistently in selected texts as housewives, home maker, child trainers and with a fixed social roles and position of being in the kitchen running errands for the family and training the girl child to accept her roles in the society as the norm, legitimate and ideal. The research therefore concluded that despite the shift in women portrayal in advertisement, men and women are still presented in their traditional gender roles. Hence, creative directors, copy writers and ad producers must therefore upscale their skills, embrace gender equality in their presentations of women and men in household advertisements thereby promoting women not only in a domestic manner, but more as professionals and significant.

Author Biographies

Oluwakemi E. Akerele-Popoola, Department of Mass Communication Landmark University, Omu-Aran Kwara State, Nigeria



Prof. Adesina Lukuman Azeez, Department of Mass Communication University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria




Published
2022-04-29
How to Cite
AKERELE-POPOOLA, Oluwakemi E.; AZEEZ, Prof. Adesina Lukuman. Production and Reception of Patriarchal Ideology in Seasoning Product Advertisements. SAU JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, [S.l.], v. 7, n. 1, p. 32-38, apr. 2022. Available at: <https://journals.sau.edu.ng/index.php/sjmas/article/view/684>. Date accessed: 28 june 2022.
Section
Articles